Spring 2015: “History on Display” sneak peek!

History on Display
How Osage Catholic Mission shaped St. Paul and Southeast Kansas

Come for the animal display, stay for the history – or vice versa.

The Osage Mission-Neosho County Museum, located at 203 Washington in St. Paul, features dozens of displays documenting SEK history, including the popular "Born to Hunt" exhibit

The Osage Mission-Neosho County Museum, located at 203 Washington in St. Paul, features dozens of displays documenting SEK history, including the popular “Born to Hunt” exhibit

Truth is, whatever it is that brings you in to the Osage Mission-Neosho County Museum in St. Paul, there’s plenty more where it came from.

“We’re getting to the point now that we’re pretty full,” says Ed Born, past president of the museum and husband of current president Jolene Born. “People bring items to us all the time, and until the last couple of years, we never turned anything down. But we’re getting a little fussy now.”

That’s because St. Paul has a lot of history – almost too much to fit in a standard small-town museum. As a result, the Osage Mission-Neosho County Museum grows and grows with each passing year…

Want to keep reading about St. Paul’s Osage Mission-Neosho County Museum? Check out the spring issue of Southeast Kansas Living, out now! It includes this story in its entirety, plus so much more. Subscribe now, or contact us to find a newsstand near you.

Spring 2015: “The Mysterious Morel” sneak peek!

The Mysterious Morel
Where the beloved mushrooms grow – and how to find them

This time every year, Logan Martin sees an influx of visitors to state parks and wildlife areas.

Photo courtesy of George Sayers, avid morel hunter in Southeast Kansas and member of the Kaw Valley Mycological Society

Photo courtesy of George Sayers, avid SEK morel hunter and member of the Kaw Valley Mycological Society

But many of those Southeast Kansans aren’t out to simply relax and enjoy the scenery: Hundreds are actually on the hunt for the prized – and mysterious – morel mushroom.

“There might not be as many morel hunters as there are people chasing game or fish, but there’s almost always a lot of locals out looking in early spring,” says Martin, a bio-technician with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism’s Pittsburg office. “Usually we can tell when the morels are starting to pop up because we’ll see the same pick-ups parked out there every year.”

What makes the morel so sought-after? For one, as many hunters will tell you, it’s delicious – whether sautéed, fried or baked. It’s also typically hard to find (and, therefore, pretty expensive), and that elusiveness lures even more folks out of the house and on the hunt every spring.

“A lot of people are pretty protective over their spots,” Martin says. “If the morel is there one year, a lot of times it’ll be there the next year.”

But, of course, it’s not always that simple…

Want to keep reading about the search for morel mushrooms in Southeast Kansas? Check out the spring issue of Southeast Kansas Living, out now! It includes this story in its entirety, plus so much more. Subscribe now, or contact us to find a newsstand near you.